Education

Local food by the books - learning in the cafeteria & classroom

Farm to school seeks to support educational outcomes for students by promoting activities that engage children and families in learning about, and developing skills related to eating healthfully and understanding the food system. Farm to school curricula and experiential activities are also a platform to teach core content areas such as science, math, and language arts. Success in this sector is measured via student readiness to learn, engagement, and academic competency, student and adult food literacy, resources allocated to farm to school activities and training, and alignment of activities with state standards.


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Increase food literacy in students in schools

Increase in student knowledge about food and its impact on health, community economics, and the environment

Number of school districts offering farm to school educational activities (such as school gardening, farm field trips, Future Farmers of America, cooking, nutrition and food-based lessons)
At least 65 school districts engaged in F2S educational activities.
USDA Farm to School Census respondents who said that their district did at least one of the following: held taste testing/demos of locally produced foods, used USDA Team Nutrition materials, conducted edible gardening or orchard activities, conducted farm field trips, had farmers visit the school, hosted community events, or integrated F2S concepts into curriculum
SOURCE
2014
Number of school districts procuring local foods that accompany these purchases with educational activities
Number of schools in Oregon that have an edible garden
Oregon Department of Education school garden survey. NOTES: This number is for K-12 schools only. An additional 170 gardens exist at charter schools, Head Start sites, camps, etc. School districts responding to this survey did not necessarily indicate that their gardens were edible. A few may have included native gardens, rain gardens, etc. in their responses.
SOURCE
2016
Percentage of counties in Oregon with at least one school garden
Have at least one school garden

Do not have any school gardens

Number of schools in Oregon that have an edible garden that is actively used for educational activities
Oregon Department of Education school garden survey. NOTES: this number includes Head Start and alternative school settings. Survey respondents did not necessarily indicate that their gardens were edible. A few may have included native gardens, rain gardens, etc. in their responses.
SOURCE
2016
Oregon Harvest for Schools materials: a.) are developed and available for different products including fruits and vegetables, meat, grains, eggs, seafood, beans, and dairy, b.) are downloadable and editable, translated into Spanish, and include space to add producer profiles
Products have had promotional materials developed.
Percentage of school districts that are doing some form of promotion of local foods
Promoting local food purchases

Not promoting local food purchases

USDA Farm to School Census respondents who said that they did at least one of the following: held taste tests/demos of locally produced foods, used Smarter Lunchroom strategies, used cafeteria food coaches, used USDA Team Nutrition materials, had farmers visit the school, promoted local efforts through themed or branded promotions, promoted locally produced foods at school in general, generated media coverage, hosted community events, or celebrated F2S Month.
SOURCE
2014

Education policy and programs support farm to school activities

Education agencies allocate resources to support farm to school programming

Availability of state funding to districts in the state: a.) for food-based, agriculture-based and garden-based educational activities, b.) to link those activities with local purchasing efforts, and c.) established as permanent/recurring in the state budget
$
Approximately 20% of the $4.5 million state grant funding goes towards educational activities.
Allocated in the 2015 legislative session
SOURCE
2015

Education policy and programs support farm to school activities

Teachers, child care educators, foodservice workers, students, and producers are trained in farm to school nutrition, education and gardening activities

The number of garden educators, teachers, foodservice staff, non-profits, and producers reached by professional development/trainings
People received training from either the Oregon Department of Education or the Oregon State Lead for the National Farm to School Network.
Oregon Department of Education and Oregon State Lead for the National Farm to School Network
SOURCE
2014

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